Hardik Pandya

Hardik Himanshu Pandya (born 11 October 1993) is an Indian international cricketer who plays for Baroda in domestic cricket and Mumbai Indians in the Indian Premier League (IPL). He is an all-rounder who bats right-handed and bowls right-arm medium-fast.

Hardik Pandya was born on 11 October 1993 in Surat, Gujarat. His father Himanshu Pandya ran a small car finance business in Surat which he shut down and, shifted to Vadodara when Hardik was five, in order to facilitate his sons with better cricket training facilities. He enrolled his two sons (Hardik and Krunal) into Kiran More‘s cricket academy in Vadodara.[3] Financially weak, the Pandya family lived in a rented apartment in Gorwa, with the brothers using a second-hand car to travel to the cricket ground.[4] Hardik studied at the MK High School till ninth grade before dropping out to focus on cricket.[5]

Hardik made steady progress and junior-level cricket and, according to Krunal, “won a lot of matches single-handedly” in club cricket.[3] In an interview with the Indian Express, Hardik revealed that he was dropped from his state age-group teams due to his “attitude problems.” He added that he was “just an expressive child” who does not “like to hide [his] emotions.”[6]

Bhuvneshwar Kumar

Bhuvneshwar Kumar (born 5 February 1990) is an Indian international cricketer. He plays for Uttar Pradesh in domestic cricket, and Sunrisers Hyderabad in the Indian Premier League. Kumar is a right-arm fast-medium bowler who swings the ball both ways efficiently, especially adept at creating late swing, and a useful lower order right-handed batsman. His talent was first noticed in a T20 match against Pakistan, where he successfully took a three-wicket haul. In the ODI series that followed, he bowled a magic delivery to Mohammad Hafeez – cleaning up his stumps and thus ensuring his place in the Indian squad for the rest of the series. He later proved to be a match winner for India.

Bhuvi was born in Western UP on 5 February 1990 to Kiran Pal Singh and Indresh in Meerut.[1] His father was an ASP with the Uttar Pradesh Police and his mother, a homemaker. He belongs to village Luharli near Gulaothi in Bulandshahr. It was his sister Rekha Adhana, who encouraged him to play cricket and took him to his first coaching centre when he was 13.[2]

Navjot Singh Sidhu

Navjot Singh Sidhu (born 20 October 1963) is an Indian politician, television personality and former cricketer. He currently serves as the Minister of Local Government, Tourism, Cultural Affairs, Archives and Museums of the State of Punjab.[1]

As a professional cricketer, Sidhu had a career spanning over 19 years after his first-class debut in 1981–82. After losing his place in the national team after his international debut in 1983–84, Sidhu returned to score four half-centuries in the 1987 World Cup. Playing mostly as a top-order batsman, Sidhu went on to play in 51 Tests and 131 One Day Internationals for the country. He came to be known for his six-hitting ability and earned the sobriquet ‘Sixer Sidhu’.[2] After retirement, he turned to commentary and television, most notably as a judge of comedy shows, and as a permanent guest in Comedy Nights with Kapil (2013–15) and later The Kapil Sharma Show (since 2016).

Sidhu joined the Bharatiya Janata Party in 2004 and contested the general election from Amritsar. He won the election and held the seat till 2014 winning also the next election. He was nominated to the Rajya Sabha in 2016 from Punjab before he resigned from the position the same year and quitting the party. In 2017, he joined the Indian National Congress and was elected to the Punjab Legislative Assembly from Amritsar East.

Sunil Gavaskar

Sunil Manohar “Sunny” Gavaskar About this sound pronunciation  (born 10 July 1949) is an Indian former cricketer who played during the 1970s and 1980s for the Bombay cricket team and Indian national team. Widely regarded as one of the greatest opening batsmen in cricket history, Gavaskar set world records during his career for the most Test runs and most Test centuries scored by any batsman. He held the record of 34 Test centuries for almost two decades before it was broken by Sachin Tendulkar in December 2005. He was the first person to score centuries in both innings of a Test match three times. He was the first Test batsman to score 10,000 Test Runs in a Career and now stands at number 12 on the group of 12 players of with 10,000 Test Runs.

Gavaskar was widely admired for his technique against fast bowling, with a particularly high average of 65.45 against the West Indies, who possessed a four-pronged fast bowling attack regarded as the most vicious in Test history. His captaincy of the Indian team, however, was less successful. Turbulent performances of the team led to multiple exchanges of captaincy between Gavaskar and Kapil Dev, with one of Gavaskar’s sackings coming just six months before Kapil led India to victory at the 1983 Cricket World Cup.

Gavaskar is a recipient of the Indian civilian honours of the Padma Shri and the Padma Bhushan.[1] In 2012, he was awarded the Col CK Nayudu Lifetime Achievement Award for Cricket in India.[2][3]

On 28 March 2014, Supreme Court of India, appointed Gavaskar as the Interim BCCI President primarily to oversee 7th Season of Indian Premier League. The Court also directed him to relinquish his job as a Cricket Commentator.[4]

Ravi Shastri

Ravishankar Jayadritha Shastri (born 27 May 1962) is a former Indian cricketer[1] and former Director for the Indian cricket team.[2] He represented the Indian national team in both Test and One-Day matches between 1981 and 1992. Although he started his career as a left arm spin bowler, he later transformed into a batting all–rounder.

As a batsman, he was essentially defensive with his trademark “chapati shot”[3][4] (a flick off the pads), but he could raise his strike rate when required. Due to his above-average height (he stood 6′ 3″ tall) and an upright stance, he had a limited number of shots against fast bowling, but was able to put the lofted shot to good use against spin bowling. Shastri played either as an opening batsman or in the middle order.

The highlight of his career was when he was elected Champion of Champions in the World Championship of Cricket in Australia in 1985. In the same season, he equalled West Indian Garry Sobers‘s record of hitting six sixes in an over in first class cricket. He was regarded as a potential captain, but his image outside cricket,[5] injuries and tendency to lose form at crucial times meant that he captained India in only one Test match.

In domestic cricket, he played for Bombay and led them to the Ranji Trophy title in his final year of playing. He also played four seasons of county cricket for Glamorgan. He was forced to retire aged 31 due to a recurring knee injury. He now does commentary on behalf of BCCI in the matches that India plays.[6] In 2014, he became the director of Indian Cricket team for a period of eight months from India’s tour of England till the World Cup 2016 . In June 2016, Shastri had applied for the job of coach of the Indian cricket team, but lost the race to Anil Kumble, an Indian cricketer.[7]

Virender Sehwag

Virender Sehwag About this sound pronunciation  (born 20 October 1978) is a former Indian cricketer, and a former captain of India. Often considered as one of the most destructive batsman of the game, Sehwag is an aggressive right-handed opening batsman and a part-time right-arm off-spin bowler. He played his first One Day International in 1999 and joined the Indian test side in 2001.[2] In April 2009, Sehwag became the only Indian to be honoured as the Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World for his performance in 2008,[3] subsequently becoming the first player of any nationality to retain the award for 2009.[4]

Sehwag holds multiple records including the highest score made by an Indian in Test cricket (319 against South Africa at M. A. Chidambaram Stadium in Chennai), which was also the fastest triple century in the history of international cricket (reached 300 off only 278 balls) as well as the fastest 250 by any batsman (in 207 balls against Sri Lanka on 3 December 2009 at the Brabourne Stadium in Mumbai). Sehwag also holds the distinction of being one of four batsmen in the world to have ever surpassed 300 twice in Test cricket, and the only one to score two triple centuries and take a five-wicket innings haul.[5] In March 2009, Sehwag smashed what was till then the fastest century ever scored by an Indian in ODI cricket, from 60 balls.[6] On 8 December 2011, he hit his maiden double century in ODI cricket, against West Indies, becoming the second batsman after Sachin Tendulkar to reach the landmark.[7] His score became the highest individual score in ODI cricket – 219 off 149 balls which was later bettered by Rohit Sharma – 264 off 173 balls on 13 November 2014.[8][9][10] He is one of only two players in the world to score a double hundred in ODI and a triple hundred in Test Cricket, the other being Chris Gayle.[11]

Sehwag was appointed as vice-captain of the Indian team under Rahul Dravid in October 2005 but due to poor form, he was later replaced by V. V. S. Laxman in December 2006 as Test vice-captain. In January 2007, Sehwag was dropped from the ODI team and later from the Test team as well.[12] During his term as vice-captain, Sehwag skippered the team in place of injured Dravid in 2 ODIs and 1 Test. Following his return to form in 2008 and the retirement of Anil Kumble, Sehwag was reappointed as the vice-captain for both Tests and ODIs. By early 2009, Sehwag had reestablished himself as one of the best performing batsmen in ODI cricket.[13] Sehwag retired from all forms of International cricket on October 20, 2015.[14]

Sehwag is currently well praised throughout the country for his witty humor-filled tweets on the micro-blogging site Twitter relating to current affairs

MS Dhoni

Mahendra Singh Dhoni (About this sound pronunciation ; commonly known as MS Dhoni; born 7 July 1981) is an Indian cricketer who captained the Indian team in limited-overs formats from 2007 to 2016 and in Test cricket from 2008 to 2014. An attacking right-handed middle-order batsman and wicket-keeper, he is widely regarded as one of the greatest finishers in limited-overs cricket.[2][3][4][5] He is also regarded to be one of the best wicket-keepers in world cricket and is known to have very fast hands.[6] He made his One Day International (ODI) debut in December 2004 against Bangladesh, and played his first Test a year later against Sri Lanka.

Dhoni holds numerous captaincy records such as most wins by an Indian captain in Tests and ODIs, and most back-to-back wins by an Indian captain in ODIs. He took over the ODI captaincy from Rahul Dravid in 2007 and led the team to its first-ever bilateral ODI series wins in Sri Lanka and New Zealand. Under his captaincy, India won the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, the CB Series of 2007–08, the 2010 Asia Cup, the 2011 ICC Cricket World Cup and the 2013 ICC Champions Trophy. In the final of the 2011 World Cup, Dhoni scored 91 not out off 79 balls handing India the victory for which he was awarded the Man of the Match. In June 2013, when India defeated England in the final of the Champions Trophy in England, Dhoni became the first captain to win all three ICC limited-overs trophies (World Cup, Champions Trophy and the World Twenty20). After taking up the Test captaincy in 2008, he led the team to series wins in New Zealand and West Indies, and the Border-Gavaskar Trophy in 2008, 2010 and 2013. In 2009, Dhoni also led the Indian team to number one position for the first time in the ICC Test rankings. In 2013, under his captaincy, India became the first team in more than 40 years to whitewash Australia in a Test series. In the Indian Premier League, he captained the Chennai Super Kings to victory at the 2010 and 2011 seasons, along with wins in the 2010 and 2014 editions of Champions League Twenty20. He announced his retirement from Tests on 30 December 2014.[7]

Dhoni holds the post of Vice-President of India Cements Ltd., after resigning from Air India. India Cements is the owner of the IPL team Chennai Super Kings, and Dhoni has been its captain since the first IPL season.[8][9] Dhoni is the co-owner of Indian Super League team Chennaiyin FC.[10]

Dhoni has been the recipient of many awards, including the ICC ODI Player of the Year award in 2008 and 2009 (the first player to win the award twice), the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna award in 2007 and the Padma Shri, India’s fourth highest civilian honour, in 2009.[11] He was named as the captain of ICC World Test XI and ICC World ODI XI teams for 2009. The Indian Territorial Army conferred the honorary rank of Lieutenant Colonel[12] to Dhoni on 1 November 2011. He is the second Indian cricketer after Kapil Dev to have received this honour. In 2011, Time magazine included Dhoni in its annual Time 100 list as one of the “Most Influential People in the World.”[13] In 2012, SportsPro rated Dhoni as the sixteenth most marketable athlete in the world.[14] In June 2015, Forbes ranked Dhoni at 23rd in the list of highest paid athletes in the world, estimating his earnings at US$31 million.[15] In 2016, a biopic M.S. Dhoni: The Untold Story was made on him.

Sachin Tendulkar

Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar (Listeni/ˌsəɪn tɛnˈdlkər/; Hindi/Marathi: सचिन तेंडुलकर; born 24 April 1973) is a former Indian cricketer and captain, widely regarded as one of the greatest batsmen of all time.[4] He took up cricket at the age of eleven, made his Test debut on 15 November 1989 against Pakistan in Karachi at the age of sixteen, and went on to represent Mumbai domestically and India internationally for close to twenty-four years. He is the only player to have scored one hundred international centuries, the first batsman to score a double century in a One Day International, the holder of the record for the number of runs in both ODI and Test cricket, and the only player to complete more than 30,000 runs in international cricket.[5]

In 2002, just halfway through his career, Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack ranked him the second greatest Test batsman of all time, behind Don Bradman, and the second greatest ODI batsman of all time, behind Viv Richards.[6] Later in his career, Tendulkar was a part of the Indian team that won the 2011 World Cup, his first win in six World Cup appearances for India.[7] He had previously been named “Player of the Tournament” at the 2003 edition of the tournament, held in South Africa. In 2013, he was the only Indian cricketer included in an all-time Test World XI named to mark the 150th anniversary of Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack.[8][9][10]

Tendulkar received the Arjuna Award in 1994 for his outstanding sporting achievement, the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna award in 1997, India’s highest sporting honour, and the Padma Shri and Padma Vibhushan awards in 1999 and 2008, respectively, India’s fourth and second highest civilian awards.[11] After a few hours of his final match on 16 November 2013, the Prime Minister’s Office announced the decision to award him the Bharat Ratna, India’s highest civilian award.[12][13] He is the youngest recipient to date and the first ever sportsperson to receive the award.[14][15] He also won the 2010 Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy for cricketer of the year at the ICC awards.[16] In 2012, Tendulkar was nominated to the Rajya Sabha, the upper house of the Parliament of India.[17] He was also the first sportsperson and the first person without an aviation background to be awarded the honorary rank of group captain by the Indian Air Force.[18] In 2012, he was named an Honorary Member of the Order of Australia.[19][20]

In December 2012, Tendulkar announced his retirement from ODIs.[21] He retired from Twenty20 cricket in October 2013[22] and subsequently announced his retirement from all forms of cricket,[23][24] retiring on 16 November 2013 after playing his 200th and final Test match, against the West Indies in Mumbai’s Wankhede Stadium.[25] Tendulkar played 664 international cricket matches in total, scoring 34,357 runs.[5]